July 9th Meetup – Fluidabilities: A Presentation And Discussion On Internet, Digital Art And The Law

Our speaker this month will be Hiba Ali. Hiba Ali is a new media artist, writer and musician from Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. Her digital and sculptural installations and performances focus on the history of objects that are produced from global circuits and their embedded codes, encompassing both the technological and sociological. She conducts workshops around open-source technologies, reading groups about technology, personal and colonial histories. She has worked with black, immigrant, queer, brown, white, old and young populations and community organizing and employs digital technology in ways that empower people. She holds two undergraduate degrees from the School of the Art Institute Chicago with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film, Video, New Media and Animation and a Bachelor of Arts in Visual, Critical Studies. She is a Master of Fine Arts candidate at University of Texas-Austin. She has exhibited and presented her work in Chicago (IL), Toronto (ON), New York (NY), Istanbul (TR), Detroit (MI), London (UK), Riga (LV) and Dubai (UAE).

Can you imagine a world where people are being sued for using electricity or a world where being able to drink water is afforded to those who can purchase a patent? This reality (or shall we say, nightmare) is very easily possible, we live in a world where an increasingly privatized sphere informs us that every content is unique or is only afforded to those who have purchasing power. At this precipice, artists are bold innovators that remix, reassert and challenge archaic notions of proprietary patents. Please join new media artist and theorist, Hiba Ali for a discussion and presentation on digital media artists, uses of appropriation and remixing of digital culture.

You can see examples of some of the works Hiba has created at her website: http://hibaali.info/

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Join us for the discussion from 7:00PM-9:00PM, followed by drinks and camaraderie from 9:00PM-10:00PM at Firehouse Lounge (605 Brazos St).

Capital Factory is located at 701 Brazos Street, on the 16th floor of the Omni Hotel. Once on the 16th floor, there should be a sign at the front desk directing you to our meetup. If there is no sign, and no one is on duty at the desk, we are usually in the room to the left of the front desk.

Talk will be livestreamed at https://www.youtube.com/user/austintechlive

Parking for the Omni Garage can be validated at the Capital Factory front desk, reducing the cost from $16 to $5. Details: https://capitalfactory.com/parking/

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Fluidabilities: A Conversation On Internet, Digital Art And The Law

Monday, Jul 9, 2018, 7:00 PM

Capital Factory
701 Brazos Street, Suite 1601 Austin, TX

15 Activists Attending

Our speaker this month will be Hiba Ali. Hiba Ali is a new media artist, writer and musician from Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. Her digital and sculptural installations and performances focus on the history of objects that are produced from global circuits and their embedded codes, encompassing both the technological and sociological. She conducts work…

Check out this Meetup →

https://www.facebook.com/events/223496681574684/

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May 14th Meetup – The Tyranny Of Contract

Our speaker this month will be Christopher Brown. Christopher Brown is an Austin-based science fiction writer and technology lawyer. He is the World Fantasy Award-nominated author of Tropic of Kansas, a novel published by Harper Voyager in 2017 that Cory Doctorow called “spookily prescient…timely, dark and ultimately hopeful,” NPR described as “a modern dystopian buffet…the nightly news with the volume turned up to 11,” and Booklist said reads like “Cormac McCarthy meets Philip K. Dick.” His novel Rule of Capture, the beginning of a series of speculative legal thrillers about a criminal defense lawyer in an authoritarian USA, is forthcoming from Harper in 2019. He has taken two tech companies public as general counsel, including Austin fintech company NetSpend, led the corporate practice in the Austin office of Baker Botts, and served as a staff lawyer to the Senate Judiciary Committee, experiences he now brings to bear as a solo practitioner focused on the representation of mission-oriented start-ups.

Website: http://christopherbrown.com or brownlawatx.com

Twitter: @NB_Chris

Christopher is going to be speaking to us about the tyranny of contract, about how click-wrap agreements and NDAs have subverted the emancipatory potential of the Internet, indentured its creators, and enabled our current dystopias—and how new technologies may help us build a new paradigm. In the words of Prof. Joshua Fairfield: “If courts won’t protect consumers, robots will.”

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Join us for the discussion from 7:00PM-9:00PM, followed by drinks and camaraderie from 9:00PM-10:00PM at Firehouse Lounge (605 Brazos St).

Capital Factory is located at 701 Brazos Street, on the 16th floor of the Omni Hotel. Once on the 16th floor, there should be a sign at the front desk directing you to our meetup. If there is no sign, and no one is on duty at the desk, we are usually in the room to the left of the front desk.

Talk will be livestreamed at https://www.youtube.com/user/austintechlive

Parking for the Omni Garage can be validated at the Capital Factory front desk, reducing the cost from $16 to $5. Details: https://capitalfactory.com/parking/

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The Tyranny Of Contract

Monday, May 14, 2018, 7:00 PM

Capital Factory
701 Brazos Street, Suite 1601 Austin, TX

21 Activists Went

Our speaker this month will be Christopher Brown. Christopher Brown is an Austin-based science fiction writer and technology lawyer. He is the World Fantasy Award-nominated author of Tropic of Kansas, a novel published by Harper Voyager in 2017 that Cory Doctorow called “spookily prescient…timely, dark and ultimately hopeful,” NPR described as “a m…

Check out this Meetup →

https://www.facebook.com/events/170417760341121/

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July 11th Meetup – Cyborg Civil Liberties and the Rights of Man

Our speaker this month (Monday, July 11th) will be Rich MacKinnon. Rich is a former president of EFF-Austin and former member of the boards of the ACLU of Texas and the Central Texas Civil Liberties Project. He was present at the founding of the Electronic Frontier Foundation in the Los Altos Hills and attended the first Conference for Computers, Freedom and Privacy as a student researching the raid on Steve Jackson Games and the nascent Electronic Communications Privacy Act. He was the first political scientist in cyberspace and published the Cybergovernance trilogy on governance, crime, and punishment in virtual realities. While a graduate researcher in the UT ACTLAB, he began developing a theory of cyborg identity under the mentorship of Sandy Stone. He’s currently the founder of Borgfest, a human augmentation expo and cyborg pride festival so that he can share his cyborg theory with people through music, entertainment, and food rather than lectures and books.

As technologically-enhanced humans comprised of software, hardware and wetware, we will personally become a battlefield for intellectual property rights and the 3rd party ownership of our bodies. In the last century, civil liberties were understood in regards to the sanctity of our persons and bodies, the property we possess, and the manner in which we engage others. The 21st century reconceives the bodily boundaries as the fight moves inwards. It is a pitched battle for the ownership, licensing, and control of our augmented, alternative, and synthetic anatomies and the data and telemetry produced by them. Already, there are those walking among us whose bodies, likely unbeknownst to them, are a matrix of license and service agreements, limited warranties, and unilateral privacy policies.

Plainly put, what happens when your cyborg body part is legally understood as property as opposed to being a part of you? What are the legal challenges faced by cyborgs when parts of their bodies are owned by someone else?

Keeping in mind the distinction among civil liberties, other statutory guarantees, contractual rights, and moral claims, what challenges to our 20th century understanding of our rights can we anticipate since so much is based on the assumption that we are our bodies and our bodies, and everything which comprises them, are understood as an individual rather than a conglomeration of corporate owners operating within a human host.

What rights and liabilities do hosts have with respect to their internal property owners and vice versa? For instance, if an artificial organ maker is subject to a lawful remote search of an asset within one’s body, does the host have the right to know and/or object to the intrusion? Even the framing of the discussion is critical since the host and provider model is perhaps inherently a dehumanizing and disempowering construction. Or is it?

Could there be a basis for “humanizing the whole body” by the naturalization of third-party property introduced into the body and eventually superseding third-party claims? In other words, if it’s in you or attached to you, then it’s yours after a point, regardless of the contracts and property laws. Would such an effort undermine the development of beneficial cyborg technology and/or healthcare?

Join us for a discussion of these questions and more.

Monday, July 11, 2016 at Capital Factory

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