September 12th Meetup – The Name Space

“The US has confirmed it is finally ready to cede power of the internet’s naming system, ending the almost 20-year process to hand over a crucial part of the internet’s governance.” ~ Dave Lee, BBC News, http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-37114313

Attorney Scott McCullough will discuss the policy and law aspects of the internet naming system. Andrew Donoho will be discussing the basic technical hierarchy and how countries get involved with limiting access to the name space. I.e. how a government can block Twitter.

Should managing the global name space be the responsibility of the technorati? Or governments? How can we prevent dictatorships or religious autocracies from getting veto control over the administration of global top level domains? (Because of delegation, they can block the DNS at their borders.)

The Name Space

Monday, Sep 12, 2016, 7:00 PM

Capital Factory
701 Brazos Street, Suite 1601 Austin, TX

13 Activists Went

“The US has confirmed it is finally ready to cede power of the internet’s naming system, ending the almost 20-year process to hand over a crucial part of the internet’s governance.” ~ Dave Lee, BBC News, http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-37114313Attorney Scott McCullough will discuss the policy and law aspects of the internet naming system. Andre…

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May 9th Meetup – The Role of Government Regulation in the Sharing Economy

Our speaker this month will be Chris Herndon. Chris is a serial entrepreneur with a geeky obsession for real estate. He most recently co-founded The Guild, a early-stage, Austin-based startup that’s combining the charm and authenticity of short-term rentals with the consistent quality and service of hotels. Prior to the Guild, Chris co-founded Apartment List (AL), an SF-based rental marketplace that operates nationwide and has raised over $30 million of venture capital. Prior to AL, Chris co-founded Philanthropedia (an online directory of impactful nonprofits, acquired by Guidestar in 2011) and The 40 Acres Group (an Austin-based apartment owner operator that merged with State Street Properties in 2012). Early in his career, Chris spent 5 years in finance (Goldman & GTCR Golder Rauner) between undergrad at Texas and business school at Stanford.

Chris will be speaking to us about the role of government regulation in the sharing economy. In February of 2016, the Austin city council passed two ordinances that will significantly restrict the usage of sharing economy marketplaces like Uber, Lyft, AirBNB and Homeaway. These announcements prompted venture capitalist Mike Maples, Jr. to tweet that his firm, Floodgate Ventures, would no longer invest in Austin-based on-demand companies due to the hostile regulatory environment. During this discussion, we’ll explore the role of government regulation in the sharing economy. Were the Austin city council’s measures justified to preserve the public’s safety and quiet enjoyment of its neighborhoods, or have they gone too far, stifling innovation?

The meetup will be at Capital Factory at 7:00pm on Monday, May 9th.

February 8th Meetup – Crafting Public Policy Governing the Use of Police Body Cameras

Our speaker this month will be Kathy Mitchell. Kathy is a volunteer with the Texas Electronic Privacy Coalition working to require police to get a warrant to access cell phone location data. She was a policy analyst on Open Government issues for Consumers Union for several years and led public advocate negotiating of the last major rewrite of the Public Information Act. In 2006, she was the PAC Treasurer for a Prop that would have opened police misconduct records if it had passed. She has been in the trenches for more than 20 years trying to make sure the public can see government records and hold government accountable while protecting that same public from government intrusion in the form of unwarranted surveillance.

Kathy will be discussing the privacy and data retention issues surrounding the coming widespread use of Police Body Cameras both in Austin and at large. Very soon, Austin police officers will be equipped with video cameras (body cams) that will always be on during encounters with the public. But the city has yet to finalize a policy around data collection, data privacy, data retention/expunction and public access. There is a strong interest in public access, especially for video related to misconduct or incidents in which a civilian is hurt or killed. There is also a strong interest in privacy for everyone who may be the subject of body camera video. This talk will walk through some of the options that are on the table for an APD body camera policy that encourages accountability while also protecting privacy. We will also discuss the process by which such a policy could be enacted, and what will happen if we enact no policy at all.

A good resource for attendees to read beforehand: http://calibrepress.com/2016/01/barriers-to-officer-worn-video-the-ten-per-cent-challenge/

Legislation authorizing body cams and setting the legal framework for Texas: 84(R) SB 158 – Enrolled version – Bill Text

City of Austin APD Bodycam page

COA body cam vendor RFP, now closed but downloadable: COA Financial Services

Current body cam policy to be replaced by one that addresses key issues: http://austintexas.gov/sites/default/files/files/Police/APD_Policy_2015-2_Issued_5-1-2015-updated.pdf (Go to policy 303 at page 125.)

Other references:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-watch/wp/2016/02/05/a-new-report-shows-the-limits-of-police-body-cameras/

https://www.brennancenter.org/analysis/police-body-camera-policies-privacy-and-first-amendment-protections