Cory Doctorow Rejoins EFF to Eradicate DRM Everywhere

Cory Doctorow with EFF-Austin
Cory Doctorow visiting EFF-Austin last October.

San Francisco – Leading digital rights champion and author Cory Doctorow has rejoined the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) to battle the pervasive use of dangerous digital rights management (DRM) technologies that threaten users’ security and privacy, distort markets, confiscate public rights, and undermine innovation.

Doctorow will be a special consultant to the Apollo 1201 Project, a mission to eradicate DRM in our lifetime. Apollo 1201 will challenge the use of DRM as well as the legal structures that support it.

“Apollo was a decade-long plan to do something widely viewed as impossible: go to the moon. Lots of folks think it’s impossible to get rid of DRM. But it needs to be done,” said Doctorow. “Unless we can be sure that our computers do what we tell them, and don’t have sneaky programs designed to take orders from some distant corporation, we can never trust them. It’s the difference between ‘Yes, master’ and ‘I CAN’T LET YOU DO THAT DAVE.'”

Working in the United States and across the globe, Doctorow will accelerate the movement to repeal laws protecting DRM, assist EFF with DRM-related litigation, and work with industry to kick-start a vibrant market in viable, legal alternatives to digital locks.

For many years, EFF has fought the use of DRM technologies, explaining that such technologies-as well as the laws that support them-impede innovation, security, and basic user rights and expectations, while failing to inhibit copyright infringement. One example of this lose-lose proposition is Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), which generally prohibits unlocking “access controls” like DRM. That ban was meant to deter illegal copying of software, but many companies have misused the law to chill competition, free speech, and fair use. Software is in all kinds of devices, from cars to coffee-makers to alarm clocks. If that software is locked down by DRM, tinkering, repairing, and re-using those devices can lead to legal risk.

Section 1201 has also put a dangerous chill on security researchers, who face potential legal penalties for finding and disclosing critical flaws in systems-from smartphones to home automation. As a result, the public gets to find out about compromising vulnerabilities too late, or not at all.

“We’ve seen DRM misused again and again, whether it’s to thwart competition in printer-ink cartridges, to prevent videogame fans from modifying their consoles, or to block consumers from reading the parts’ specifications on their own cars,” said EFF Intellectual Property Director Corynne McSherry. “Cory has an unparalleled ability to show the public how bad copyright policy tramples on everyone’s rights.”

Doctorow worked for EFF for four years as its European Affairs Coordinator, and in 2007, he won EFF’s Pioneer Award for his body of work on digital civil liberties. He’s the originator of “Doctorow’s Law,” which has helped many around the world understand the dangers of DRM: “Anytime someone puts a lock on something you own, against your wishes, and doesn’t give you the key, they’re not doing it for your benefit.”

“No matter how noble your cause, you can’t advance it by insisting that computers everywhere be equipped with spyware to stop people from running the ‘wrong’ code,” said Doctorow. “The bad guys will still figure out how to run that code, and everyone else will end up with critical infrastructure that, by design, treats them as untrustable attackers and, by design, lets remote parties covertly seize control of the computers around them. We all deserve a better future-one without DRM.”

For more on DRM: https://www.eff.org/issues/drm

Contacts:
Cory Doctorow Special Consultant, Apollo 1201 Project Electronic Frontier Foundation cory@eff.org
Corynne McSherry Intellectual Property Director Electronic Frontier Foundation corynne@eff.org

Two Austin projects want to be a catalyst for the commons

Creative Commons recently offered catalyst grants to help spur awareness and use of Creative Commons.

Two grants have been proposed from Austin, one studying the music scene and one promoting the literature scene.

You can support either of the projects in the dicusssion part of the page describing the full project.

Mapping Austin’s Music Ecosystem

The following proposes the examination of Creative Commons (CC) licensing and its adoption among musicians in the Austin area, often called the live music capital of the world. The study attempts to answer the following question: What considerations determine whether musicians adopt CC licenses for their work? While there are a handful of related works and case studies that bring to light, “how many use CC licenses”, there remains a considerable gap in volume and quality of content. We propose to expand the research and to examine the local music ecosystem in-depth

Full Description and Discussion

Common Quill

This project would produce a web site hosting CC and public domain fiction allowing derivative works. Inpiduals will be able to borrow a character, place, creature, thing or theme from a story and create a derivative work. You will also be able to view the creative DNA of a work, much like CC Mixter, by seeing where a character or work originated and who has remixed it.

Full Description and Discussion

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EFF-Austin presents Richard Stallman

EFF-Austin invites you to a talk by the Free Software Foundation Activist – Richard Stallman on 23rd April 2009.

Talk Abstract:
Richard Stallman wrote the first GNU General Public License in 1989, and version 3 which was completed in 2007. He will discuss the philosophy of the GNU GPL, the changes made in version 3, and the reasons for those changes.

A must attend for software enthusiasts, developers, entrepreneurs, managers, and students. There is limited seating at the venue: first come, first served registration will apply.

Speaker Bio:
Richard Stallman launched the development of the GNU operating system (see www.gnu.org) in 1984. GNU is free software: everyone has the freedom to copy it and redistribute it, as well as to make changes either large or small. The GNU/Linux system, basically the GNU operating system with Linux added, is used on tens of millions of computers today. Stallman has received the ACM Grace Hopper Award, a MacArthur Foundation fellowship,the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Pioneer award, and the the Takeda Award for Social/Economic Betterment, as well as several honorary doctorates.

Thanks to Saurabh Sureka (sab at ieee.org) for coordinating the presentation.