State Sponsored Censorship At Standing Rock

It’s Cracked, so take it with a grain of salt until others confirm, but there appears to a massive law enforcement censorship effort going on at Standing Rock. TL:DR – law enforcement agencies from multiple states are using planes and drones equipped with Stingrays to disrupt the ability of cell phones at Standing Rock to connect to the internet. They’re coupling this with DDoS attacks aimed at the camp’s secure wifi hotspots along with their own honeypot unsecured wifi hotspots designed to hack protesters’ devices and accounts. This is censorship on the level of Egypt trying to shut down the internet during the Arab Spring.

http://www.cracked.com/personal-experiences-2418-the-standing-rock-hacks-cracked-unravels-real-conspiracy.html

EFF-Austin Hosts A Performance Of The Play Privacy Settings!

EFF-Austin board member Heather Barfield has conceived and directed a new play at The Vortex theater titled Privacy Settings. Based on the ancient Greek play of Prometheus Bound, Privacy Settings imagines Edward Snowden in the titular role of Prometheus, the titan whole stole fire from the gods and gifted it to mankind. The play is inspired by the actions and punishments of contemporary whistle-blowers, advocates for digital privacy rights and perversions of American civil liberties. Privacy Settings offers a “surveillance fun house” with opportunities for unique interactive experiences. Some of these experiences include actionable tips about how you can increase your digital privacy from the moment you walk out of the play later that evening.

EFF-Austin has managed to obtain a special deal for our followers to see the play for the low price of $10 a person on Thursday, June 16th at 8:00pm. On the night of the show you can mention that you’re with EFF-Austin to the Box Office and they will allow you to purchase the discounted tickets, which are being held for our group in our name. EFF-Austin board member Kevin Welch will be your host for the evening and will arrive at 6:30pm to lead a pre-show hour of drinks, socialization, and dinner at the adjacent Butterfly Bar and Patrizi’s Italian food trailer. Following the play, EFF-Austin president Jon Lebkowsky will lead a talkback to discuss the issues raised by the play.

We encourage everyone in the Austin tech community, as well as anyone who wants to learn more about the modern surveillance state and the increasingly large impact it’s going to have on our lives, to attend.

Please RSVP only if you are planning to attend, we are trying to get an accurate headcount.

https://www.facebook.com/events/708002946006241/
https://ctxlivetheatre.com/reviews/review-privacy-settings-a-promethean-tale-by-vo/
http://www.vortexrep.org/
http://butterflybaraustin.com/build/
http://www.patrizis.com/
https://www.facebook.com/events/1700148823579500/

EFF-Austin Hosts A Performance Of The Play Privacy Settings!

Thursday, Jun 16, 2016, 6:30 PM

The Vortex
2307 Manor Rd. Austin, TX

16 Activists Went

EFF-Austin board member Heather Barfield has conceived and directed a new play at The Vortex theater titled Privacy Settings. Based on the ancient Greek play of Prometheus Bound, Privacy Settings imagines Edward Snowden in the titular role of Prometheus, the titan whole stole fire from the gods and gifted it to mankind. The play is inspired by the …

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Rebecca MacKinnon: Consent of the Networked

Consent of the NetworkedDon’t miss the two-week discussion with Rebecca MacKinnon, author of Consent of the Networked, about global online civil liberties, led by EFF-Austin’s Jon Lebkowsky, currently in progress on the WELL.

Now, I assume everybody here is familiar with the recent fight to kill the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), where we saw a joining of forces between American Internet companies and activists against the entertainment industry and other American companies that fall under the category of “the copyright lobby.” It is unfortunate that some American businesses want to corrode people’s freedom to connect in order to protect their outmoded business models, and fortunate that other American businesses are putting some serious cash and lobbying muscle into countering them. But congress wouldn’t have halted its trajectory if it hadn’t been for the grassroots activists like Fightforthefuture.org and many others, as well as nonprofits like Wikipedia who brought a moral force to the argument that tipped the scales and mobilized voters to call their representatives.

When it comes to legislation like the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) which passed the House and is on its way to the Senate, the role of American Internet companies is a lot more troubling. Despite concerns that this legislation lacks safeguards that would protect Americans from unaccountable spying by the NSA and others, many American businesses continue to support it because they are concerned about the security of their networks and want something to be done. They have yet to be convinced that they should only support legislation that contains adequate civil liberties protections. Which brings me back to the original point- achieving freedom to connect is much easier than achieving freedom from illegitimate, unaccountable surveillance.

Finally, there is the issue of what I call the power exercised by Internet companies over people’s identities and their privacy. This has more to do with freedom from fear than freedom to connect. To make a long story short, American companies like Google and Facebook do a much better job at freedom to connect than they do at freedom from fear. For a taste of what my book says about the lands of Facebookistan and Googledom, see this adapted excerpt in Slate:
http://tinyurl.com/6ujz9yp

As for activists in the USA, people are doing a tremendous amount of good work fighting to keep our own Internet open and free, despite a lot of political and commercial forces pushing in the opposite direction. American activists working for Internet freedom elsewhere around are most effective, in my view, when they start from the premise that Internet freedom faces threats absolutely everywhere, and that the United States is a far cry from a perfect model particularly on issues of surveillance. Showing up with an attitude that basically says “Hi, I’m a white night from the land of the free riding in to save you” doesn’t tend to go down well. A more effective attitude is “Hi, I’m here in solidarity to support you in your part of the global struggle. How can I be most helpful?” A number of times I’ve seen people from Egypt, Syria and China get asked that question. Often the answer is: “sort out your own country’s contradictions so that our governments can have better models to follow.”